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Public Works

Animal Control

Pet Adoption Scheule: (Updated Information)

  • Every Saturday.
  • Time: 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
  • Location: Petsmart, Bossier City

What is Animal Control?

It is a way to help citizens and animals live together in harmony.

Animal Control means protecting:

People and Property from the dangers and nuisance of roaming uncontrolled animals.
Pets and Wild Animals from the dangers they face in the wild and on city streets.

Animal Control means knowing how to handle animals -- and how to work with people.

Why should I, as a citizen of Bossier City, learn about Animal Control?

Because your animal control program depends on you. Animal Control problems begin with people. The health and Safety of all animals and people are at risk when irresponsible pet owners:

  • let their pets roam free
  • fail to observe laws and ordinances
  • allow their pets to have unwanted litters

Solutions begin with animal control. Your animal control program can solve these problems with your help.

Meet the "uncontrolled" animal...

When roaming free, animals may:

  • Bite people - a major health and safety problem.
  • Spread disease - among themselves and human beings.
  • Destroy property - every thing from livestock to lawns.
  • Breed - at an astounding rate, producing more human and animal suffering.
  • Cause traffic accidents - resulting in both human and animal suffering.
  • Die - from accidents, fights, starvation, disease, exposure, and inhumane treatment.

Uncontrolled animals are an expensive problem

In addition to the cost from injury and property damage, thousands of tax dollars are spent each year to shelter and euthanize (kill without pain) homeless, unwanted or injured animals.

Animal Control is a big job!

The animal control unit of your Public Works department operates an animal shelter and adoption programs, to protect and find homes for unwanted companion animals. License animals to help identify and aid in the return of lost companion animals. Enforce ordinances, such as leash law, cruelty and neglect, laws governing vaccinations and companion animal welfare. Educate the public, to make citizens aware of the animal control problems and ways to solve them. Animal control personnel may also use their skills to protect and control wild animals.

Animal Control training usually includes:

Courses in communications, law, animals and public safety of the citizen as well as the companion animal, on the job experience, instruction in the animal control, departments policies and rules. Many ACO s have previous work experience of education in law enforcement and or animal handling and behavior.

Advanced training may cover:

Animal first aid and rescue, shelter management, animal handling, use of chemicals in animal capture, breed identification, human relations (working with people), stress management, legal aspect of animal control-and many other topics.

Animal Control in action:

Cruelty Investigations: Animal Control personnel enforce laws governing humane treatment of animals. If necessary, they may remove animals from unsafe or unhealthy conditions and begin legal action against negligent owners.

Complaint Investigations: Animal Control personnel may look into complaints of noisy, destructive or threatening animals. If necessary, proper legal action may be taken including citations, fines and impoundments.

Animal Rescue: Animal Control personnel use their special knowledge and equipment to help find and rescue lost or trapped animals.

Animal Ambulance: Animal Control personnel transport injured animals safely and humanely to the appropriate health care facility when found on city streets or when taken from a neglect location.

Animal Quarantine: Animals that bite are located and captured to make certain they are not carrying any disease.

A few words on some sensitive subjects:

Spaying and neutering: The "EXPLODING" animal population puts tremendous strain on citizens and animals.

The problem: Millions of puppies and kittens are born in the U.S. every year, most of them unwanted. For most unwanted animals good permanent homes are not available, instead, they end up in temporary shelters or loose on the streets. Homeless animals destroy property, spread disease, produce more animals and face short miserable lives.

The answer: Spaying or neutering your companion animal.

Euthanasia: Doing what is best for animals they love and the community they serve forces animal control personnel to make some hard decisions.

The problem: Animal shelters can usually offer only temporary shelter for the millions of unwanted animals. The cost to taxpayers for the housing of all unwanted animals on a permanent basis would be enormous. The alternative allowing animals to live in the wild or on the streets would inevitably lead to their destruction by starvation, disease and accidents.

The answer: Animal Control personnel are working tirelessly to bring the animal population under control and end the need for euthanasia. Unfortunately, until they succeed, euthanasia will remain a tragic necessity.

Myths and misconceptions contribute to animal population:The "EXPLODING" animal population puts tremendous strain on citizens and animals.

The problem: Millions of puppies and kittens are born in the U.S. every year, most of them unwanted. For most unwanted animals good permanent homes are not available, instead, they end up in temporary shelters or loose on the streets. Homeless animals destroy property, spread disease, produce more animals and face short miserable lives.

The answer: Spaying or neutering your companion animal.

Do any of these sound familiar?

"I know I can find good homes for my pet's litter."

That may be, but remember that the homes you find mean that many fewer homes are available to other animals waiting for adoption.

"But spaying and neutering make pets fat and lazy."

This is not true. You are responsible for seeing that your pet eats right and gets the proper amount of exercise.

"I just do not think it is right to keep my pet from having a litter."

Spaying and neutering does more than help solve the problem of animal overpopulation, it actually protects your pet from many health problems and helps him or her live longer and happier lives.

"I happen to know that there are shelters that do not euthanize animals."

There are such places, but they accept only animals they can house or place in homes. Most other shelters must accept all animals, including the sick, old and injured. These shelters have vast shortages of space and resources.

"I want my children to see the miracle of birth."

There is a good chance you will miss the delivery since animals often give birth in private. You may use books or films to teach children about the miracle of birth, without adding to the animal population.

What can you do to help?

Support the efforts of your Animal Control Department.

Practical Responsible Pet Ownership!

Have your pet spayed or neutered (Bonus: License fees are lower)

Do not let your pet run free. Keep him or her on a leash.

Report all cases of animal abuse or inhumane treatment.

Have your pet vaccinated.

Obey all other laws that affect you and your companion animal.

So when animals are under control everyone benefits! Support the work of your animal control department. Learn about the many services your animal control department has to offer. Practice responsible pet ownership including spaying and neutering.

 

 

 
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Contact Us

Bossier City Animal Control
3217 Old Shed Rd
P.O. Box 5337
Bossier City, LA 71171-5337
Phone: 318.741.8499
Fax: 318.741.8494

Kay LaBorde, Supervisor

Office Hours M - F: 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
Adoption Hours M - F: 10:00 am to 3:00 pm

After hours emergencies call Bossier City Police Dept. (318)-741-8611 

 
 
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Downloads

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Adoption Requirements
Policies & Procedures

 
 
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Fees

Adoption Fees

Cats and Kittnes

Kittens under four months of age

  • Spay/Neuter Fee $50.00
  • First Shots and Worming $5.00
Cats over four months of age
  • Spay/Neuter Fee $50.00
  • Rabies Shot $10.00

Dogs and Puppies

Puppies under four months of age

  • Spay/Neuter Fee $50.00
  • First Shots and Worming $5.00
Dogs over four months of age
  • Spay/Neuter Fee $60.00
  • Rabies Shot $10.00
Purebred Dogs and Cats
  • Spay/Neuter Fee $75.00
  • Rabies Shot $10.00